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My favorite place in the world to be is underwater. My second favorite place is the front of a classroom.

Monday, November 06, 2006

The ALIS Doctor Is In!

Please post your introduction and thesis statement here. Don't get too attached to it--we shall tear it apart tomorrow in class (gently and constructively).

30 Comments:

Blogger OfAThousandSuns said...

Arthur Miller’s play Death of a Salesman and JD Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye are two novels that present two men who deal with the hardships of everyday life and are forced to question the purpose of their existence.

10:39 AM  
Blogger nathan a said...

Science fiction usually has an element of caution mixed in with the perceived progress. The goal of science fiction is to show what the future will look like based on humanity’s current course. It compares progress through technology to humanity’s moral progress. The constant will to conquer, tendency to exploit others for benefit, and lack of deliberation before decision making caution against some of humanity’s irrational tendencies in Ray Bradbury’s The Martian Chronicles, and Orson Scott Card’s Ender’s Game.

11:39 AM  
Blogger Monique R said...

Irving Wallace wrote, “To be one's self, and unafraid whether right or wrong, is more admirable than the easy cowardice of surrender to conformity.” Often societies lapse into the simplicity of conventionality, losing sight of the problems this often causes. Certain individuals can get past this obstacle and stand up for their own views, changing their lives and the lives of others. Ayn Rand’s Anthem and Kurt Vonnegut’s Cat’s Cradle criticize the failures of conformist communities and in turn emphasize the importance of independent views on society.

2:32 PM  
Blogger Chris B said...

Can knowledge be defined as the traits of a leader, or a path to ones downfall? In Ayn Rand's "Anthem" and Stephen Kings "The Shining" both definitions would be quite appropriate. Anthem talks of a futuristic world with secrets unbeknownst to its inhabitants and The Shining speaks of a hotel with a not-so-pleasant history. In both books, the lead characters search to find the knowledge that they lack and in turn get exiled from their home in one way or another. In Stephen King's "The Shining" and Ayn Rand's "Anthem", the lead characters thirst for knowledge directly causes their doom which in turn demonstrates the idea that the world will always have its secrets and that sometimes curiosity needs to be controlled.

3:30 PM  
Blogger BessieS said...

In life people don’t always stand up for what they believe in or what they think is right. The society in Anthem is one where the group of people in control has convinced the other people that they are worthless and they have taken complete control of these peoples lives. Because of that there is no love in the society and when love is found it causes the characters to realize that they are free to be who ever they want to be. At the end of Something Wicked This Way Comes a similar situation arises and Charles Halloway realizes that he can not let his son and his son’s friend be controlled and put in the dangerous situations by the owners of the carnival, even if he is risking his life, he loves them too much to let them get hurt. In Ray Bradbury’s Something Wicked This Way Comes and Ayn Rand’s Anthem the main characters are controlled by an outside power and also have some self inflicted issues, but it doesn’t hold them back from overcoming that power and letting love and happiness overcome destroy the force controlling them.

4:29 PM  
Blogger Jessica K said...

"People think at the end of the day that a man is the only answer [to fulfillment]. Actually a job is better for me (Princess Diana)”. Women for centuries have been degraded and portrayed as dependent on men. Feminists such as authors Barbara Kingsolver and Anne Tyler have aided in the breakdown of this stereotype by using strong and successful women in their writing. Taylor from The Bean Trees leaves her hometown to start a new life on her own and discovers she did not have to depend on others to become happy and successful. Muriel from The Accidental Tourist must support her son and herself without assistance; however, gets through her tough times and finds herself proud of who she is. With thanks to these feminists women can be perceived as strong, content people, able to succeed on their own, and contribute to others. Barbara Kingsolver’s The Bean Trees and Anne Tyler’s The Accidental Tourist illustrate thriving, content women fully capable of independence, and helping others to feel as satisfied.

5:40 PM  
Blogger kaitlinb said...

War is wrong on every level, it ruins once beautiful places, tears once solid families and yet, brings out an unbreakable pride of a man for his country. In Hiroshima by John Hersey, a beautiful city in Japan feels the wrath of a bomb greater than any before it. Six people share their experiences on how they survived the bomb; one thoughtless act throughout their day may have saved their lives in ways more powerful than anyone of them will ever know. In The Things They Carried by Tim O ‘Brien, the war is on a different battle field in Vietnam and the people we hear of are American soldiers fighting for their distant homeland through death, injury and despair. These soldiers similar to the citizens in Japan face death with a bold face and they do this with their country holding their hearts. They lose best friends, long for home yet keep combating for their cause. Hiroshima by John Hersey and The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien explore the human pain of merciless wars, while embracing the pride and fight of a man for his country.

5:51 PM  
Blogger Sarah P said...

question: are we supposed to post just our thesis statements or are we supposed to post our entire intro?

5:57 PM  
Blogger Anoel said...

When one thinks of an alien, they think of E.T or a cheesy late night television show trying to publicize the horrors of alien abductions. No one thinks of creatures that create beautiful, ancient cities that would be any archaeologist’s playground. No one imagines creatures wiser in matters of life and death and time than our own species of man. No one envisions that perhaps aliens are more civil than humans. No one imagines extra terrestrial beings as our superiors, except famous authors Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut. In both The Martian Chronicles, by Ray Bradbury, and Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut, humans, should they demonstrate their flaws by war or fallacious ideas, have a flawed view of life, death, morality, superiority, and the world they all share.

5:58 PM  
Blogger Kelly O said...

Throughout history, the world has been a racist and sexist place. In pre-1960s America, men were thought to be better than women, and white people were thought to be better than black people. Therefore, black women were considered the lowest of the low and faced the most oppression. In her book, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Maya Angelou writes, “The Black female is assaulted in her tender years by all those common forces of nature at the same time that she is caught in the tripartite crossfire of masculine prejudice, white illogical hate, and Black lack of power. The fact that the adult American Negro female emerges a formidable character is often met with amazement, distaste and even belligerence” (Angelou 176). Maya Angelou’s I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings and Toni Morrison’s Sula depict black women in oppressive, racist societies and their struggle to choose between living a reserved life by doing what is expected of them or living life doing what they want without caring what the rest of their societies think.

6:03 PM  
Blogger Ms. Kakos said...

To answer Sarah's question: Please post your entire introductory paragraph. Thanks!

6:08 PM  
Blogger Sarah P said...

What would you do if you were trapped in an orthodox religion, where your life is constantly watched by your peers, and you want nothing else but to leave? Chaim Potok’s “The Chosen” And Barbara Kingsolver’s “The Bean Trees,” show how when people are oppressed they can eventually realize how change can be obtained, after creating life altering friendships. Both of these books bring out every emotion from anger, to awe and continually surprise the reader; but in "the Chosen," as Danny and Reuven continually strive to keep their friendship alive, a new found sense of the need for companionship is discovered. Just the same in “The Bean Trees,” where Lou Ann finds Taylor’s friendship an eye opening experience, and changes her life more than she could have ever expected.

6:09 PM  
Blogger Sarah P said...

ok thanks!!

6:10 PM  
Blogger Erin G said...

The human mind is a weak entity. It is easily manipulated to another's will and gives into desires without struggle. In "The Haunting of Hill House," a novel by Shirley Jackson, the main character is easily overridden by the house in which the story is set. The house in which the main character, Eleanor, stays, slowly eases its way into Eleanor's mind, turning her to insanity. In "The Shining," a novel by Stephen King, the main character, Jack Torrance, is slowly manipulated towards insanity by a hotel that he is caretaking. The hotel slowly gains control of Jack and uses his body as a manifestation of itself in order to maintain its power and attain its ultimate goals. In both stories, the main characters are easily manipulated by buildings with powerful and corrupt pasts. Shirley Jackson's "The Haunting of Hill House" and Stephen King's "The Shining" reveal how a building may attain the control of a human's mind by taking advantage of weak minded people and eventually gaining a personality through its past corruptions; however, the building's evil personality is the result of purely human evils.

6:11 PM  
Blogger Lauren F. said...

Why is the human race so interested in the paranormal and if it exists or not? There are so many books that have ghostly figures present throughout the story. The stories can be believed by some, but all fiction to others. “The Haunting of Hill House” by Shirley Jackson and “The Shining” by Stephen King have many similarities shared between them. In each story there is the presence of the supernatural. The supernatural manifests itself into the minds of the characters and plays mind games with them. The young boy, Danny has this “imaginary” person named Tony. Danny sees Tony a lot, and Tony shows him what is going to happen in the near future. Eleanor, in “The Haunting”, hears many weird noises and messages are written on the walls of the house. The ghostly presence in these stories is a common connection between the two stories. King’s “The Shining” and Jackson’s “The Haunting”, contain the comparable role of the supernatural, which is present throughout the stories in the minds of the main characters.

6:29 PM  
Blogger christine b. said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

6:49 PM  
Blogger christine b. said...

Cheris Kramerae once said "Feminism is the radical notion that women are human beings." Men dominate the societies of the books The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver and Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote and feminism seems to be a common theme. In The Bean Trees one of the main characters, Taylor, has no men involved in her life. She grew up with only a mother and when she leaves her small hometown of Pittman County, she goes to live with a woman named Lou Ann. Lou Ann has one child and a husband who left her for the rodeo. In Breakfast at Tiffany’s a woman named Holly Golightly lives by her own standards. She follows her impulses with all of her decisions and listens to no one, especially men, when it comes to giving advice. In both books, these women transform into leaders of their societies by succeeding without the control of men over their lives. The books The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver and Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote illustrate independent women who overcome hardships and escape danger without the dominating presence of men in order to inspire readers, especially women, that they can overcome anything with will power and determination and that women are equal to men in today’s world.

7:02 PM  
Blogger Alyssag said...

Our parents raise us to become independent individuals who can rely on ourselves for help. Imagine what it would be like if you were so timid that you had to depend on others at all times even to make simple decisions for you. Maya Angelou in I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, by Maya Angelou, and the women from The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan are strongly dependent on others because of the expectations of society of women and gender dominance, yet through trials and tribulations, they learn that the only person they can rely on and trust is themselves.

7:18 PM  
Blogger Jennifer W said...

“He died the death of a salesman, in his green velvet slippers…” (Arthur Miller 54). In Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman and John Steinbeck’s Grapes of Wrath, the death of a salesman occurs throughout each novel. In Miller’s depiction, Willy, a hardworking dad struggles to provide for his family as he becomes ill and loses faith. During Steinbeck’s representation, the Joad family struggles as they travel cross-country to uncover decent jobs and enough money to support the family. During all of this, Tom Joad is forced to hide from the cops as prior to this adventure; he had just been released from the state penitentiary. Following the journey of these two families demonstrates the struggles families are forced to endure as they try to provide for their families and achieve the ultimate goal of the American Dream.

7:19 PM  
Blogger Milt G said...

Society is indifferent to anyone who is different, persecuting and even killing them. In The Martian Chronicles the people of Earth are trying to inhabit mars. The Martian who encounter the humans either think that thee humans are insane they just kill them because they are not ready to accept that there is life on other planets. In Slaughterhouse Five the main character, Billy Pilgrim, is captured by aliens from Tralfamador who call themselves Tralfamadorians. They teach him about time travel and show him how to do it. When he comes back to Earth he tells people about it and nobody believes him because they don't want to believe in aliens or time travel because it would change their whole lives. Ray Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles and Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five both display society's reluctance to accept changes in their stable environment.

7:40 PM  
Blogger Megan D said...

“All my life I had to fight. I had to fight my daddy. I had to fight my brothers. I had to fight my cousins and my uncles. A girl child ain’t safe in a family of men” (Walker 40). Sophia tells Celie that she has to stick up for herself, and that she doesn’t need a man to control her and make her successful. Celie knows that she has to fight to break away from the abuse of her husband, but she doesn’t know how she can do that. She has been taught that a woman is defined by the man she marry’s, and that is all she knows. In the same way, Taylor in The Bean Trees breaks away from all the people that are trying to confine her. She knows that in order to be successful, she has to get out of the small town she is in, and she will fight for what she knows is right. The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver and The Color Purple by Alice Walker show the struggles of women to get out of the control of others, even when there has to be sacrifices, hardships, and things to learn.

7:59 PM  
Blogger erinl said...

“The thing women have yet to learn is nobody gives you power. You just take it” Roseanne Barr once said. Women strive to obtain power, but are often forced to relinquish their independence. The Bean Trees and The House on Mango Street are examples of women seeking and obtaining the power so many other women long for. The women of Barbara Kingsolver’s The Bean Trees and Sandra Cisneros’s The House on Mango Street strive to leave their hometowns to show their independence and determination to influence those around them in order to obtain the power they deserve.

7:59 PM  
Blogger shannon a said...

"Danny and I lived within five blocks of each other and neither of us knew of the other’s existence” (3 Potok) People everyday are affected by the people around them with out even knowing it. In The Chosen Reuven, the main character, doesn’t even know Danny living so close to him. Coming from different beliefs in Judaism and brought up in different ways, because of one accident these learn from each other. In Death of s Salesman Willy, the main character, has spent his whole life following the American way. But somehow the son, he has lived with his whole life, has taught him self something new. He helped Willy become a new man. Arthur Miller’s The Death of a Salesman and Chaim Potok’s The Chosen explain that people struggle trying to find themselves and by meeting new people, or discovering something new in a person help discover who they really are.

8:01 PM  
Blogger emilee p said...

“Every hotel has its ghosts”(King). In Shirley Jackson’s, The Haunting of Hill House and Stephen King’s, The Shining, the struggle of man against himself plays a large part in the unwinding of the plot. In The Haunting of Hill House, the main character, Eleanor Vance struggles to fit in with the other guests at the supposedly haunted, Hill House. However, in the end the house seems to claim her as its own deeming her unique and ultimatly chosen. In The Shining, the caretaker of the Overlook Hotel, Jack Torrance seems to be singled out by the unusual inhabitants of the hotel. Moreover, Eleanor and Jack seem to be driven mad; however, the “supernatural” is not always to blame. Some can argue that only man can drive himself insane. Both The Haunting of Hill House and The Shining display man’s inward struggle, which, in the end can lead to his ultimate demise.

8:02 PM  
Blogger mackenzieL said...

Most people have those little things that bother them, their “pet peeves”. Many come from child hood, little things that would happen occasionally, or even all the time that grew to be old and annoying. The people you love most can have the most annoying habits, and you swear never to do them yourself. Why do people decide to become different than their parents? This issue arises in both The Chosen, by Chaim Potok and The Joy Luck Club, by Amy Tan. In both of these books, however, the children do not grow up and decide to become different from their parents because of their habits, but because of their culture and difference from the American Way. In The Chosen by Chaim Potok and The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan, the younger generation deviates from their parent’s teachings and traditions passed on through silence and stories to embrace the American lifestyle and thus creating their own American identity.

8:04 PM  
Blogger J Hunt said...

In Tim O'Briens books The Things They Carried, and Going After Cacciatto, O'Brien relays his opinion that human nature controls ones mind and conscience.

8:05 PM  
Blogger clay w said...

Mankind is an amazing concept. When looked at through the eyes of the future, he can be seen as either beneficial or destructive. In many ways, the more advances man makes, the more beneficia he becomes. In other ways, however, man's advances can be too great for him to handle, destroying him by becoming greater than he is. Throughout history, most scientific advances that changed society were for the better, but man must be careful what he wishes for. The less mankind must do to survive, the lazier he becomes less and less suited for survival without the help of his discoveries in science and exploration. Ray Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles and Isaac Asimov's I, Robot focus on the conflict between man and his discovery, warning against scientific advances throughout society because sometimes man's discovery can become man's replacement.

10:07 AM  
Blogger JordanL said...

The search for ones identity is often a lifelong journey. The idea of an identity search is something every person struggles with. There are many things that shape you as a person and make you who you are today. People discover who they are through hard times, good times, and every day scenarios and in very unexpected ways. This is especially true in the novel, The Bean Trees, by Barbara Kingsolver, and Breakfast at Tiffany’s, by Truman Capote. These novels illustrate a self discovery and a strive for independence in ways never expected. These experiences come from adopting children or sitting on the balcony singing with friends. Through these experiences and everyday life, the characters grow and develop with the help of friends and family. The women in the novels, The Bean Trees, by Barbara Kingsolver and Breakfast at Tiffany’s, by Truman Capote show the compelling journey of women striving for independence and self discovery.

10:18 AM  
Blogger JeffN said...

you guys are very lucky to have Ms. Kakos as your teacher for American lit and during the ALIS project. trust me on this one!

8:27 PM  
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6:38 AM  

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